Education Program: Undergraduate Student Opportunities

 

Yale-China Undergraduate Student Opportunities

Exchanges Internships Fellowships
YUNA L(U)CY Hong Kong CSE Mainland CSE Teaching Fellowship (Yale Fellows) Teaching Fellowship (Chinese Fellows)
Timing Academic Term X X        
Spring Break X X        
Summer     X X    
Post-Graduation         X X
Travel to China? Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes To U.S.
Who can apply? Freshmen   X X X    
Sophomores X X X X    
Juniors X X X X    
Seniors   X X X X  
Alumni         X  
English Language Required Advanced           X
Fluent X X X X    
Native         X  
Chinese Language Required None X X X   X  
Advanced       X    
Native           X
Chinese Language Learning Opportunities Mandarin   basic   many fully-funded course  
Cantonese basic   basic   fully-funded course  
Major Any Any Any Any Any Any
Primary Location(s) New Haven Hong Kong New Haven Guangzhou New Haven
Hong Kong
New Haven Guangzhou Hong Kong
Changsha, Hunan
Xiuning, Anhui
Zhuhai, Guangdong
New Haven
Fee $500* $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Stipend $0 $0 $1,000 $800 Salary Salary
Application Deadline Sept. 30 Sept. 30 Jan. 31 Jan. 31 Nov. 30 Spring

*residential college funding is available in addition to limited financial aid from Yale-China.

 

Yale-China: Exchange Programs
 

Exchange Programs

Yale-China partners with New Asia College at The Chinese University of Hong Kong and Lingnan (University) College at Sun Yat-sen University to offer two exchange programs: YUNA and L(U)CY.

Yale-China exchange programs begin with a planning phase in the fall, during which participants prepare presentations related to an annual theme and make arrangements for theme-related activities to take place during the Chinese students’ visit to New Haven.

After hosting the Chinese students at Yale in February, the Yale delegation travels together to China during spring break in March. At Yale and in China, a full schedule of programming facilitates academic dialogue, cultural exploration, and lasting friendships among the exchange participants.

Selection for both exchange programs is administered through a combined process; applicants can elect to be considered for one or both programs.

Select a program for more details

YUNA Exchange
Open to sophomores and juniors in Yale College.
L(U)CY Exchange
Open to all Yale College students.

Yale-China: Exchange Programs Virtual Info Session
 

Exchange Programs Virtual Info Session

 

For an optimized experience, view the virtual info session in a Flash-enabled browser.


Launch

Yale-China: Virtual Info Session
 

Virtual Info Session

For an optimized, more interactive experience, view the virtual info session in a Flash-enabled browser. On iOS devices and other browsers without Flash, you will be able to view the slides in linear sequence, but links will not be enabled.

Visualize your Fellowship

Every site has its own special characteristics, and every Fellow has the flexibility to chart a unique course through the two-year experience at any given site. Take advantage of these resources to get a fuller picture of the full range of fellowship experiences through the eyes of some of these individuals.


Ready to apply for the fellowship? Visit the Application Process page and be sure to read through the Handbook for Applicants and Application Instructions.

Additional questions? Check the FAQ or contact Brendan Woo by e-mail at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) or by phone at 203-432-0850.

Videos

Yale-China: By Mary Lou Aleskie
 

By Mary Lou Aleskie

In October 2013, Mary Lou Aleskie, Executive Director of the International Festival of Arts and Ideas, and Yale-China took a trip out to China and met with a number of artists, administrators, and developers of cultural projects in China. In the excerpt below, Mary Lou, with her decades of international arts experience, comments on a China that is fortifying its cultural diplomacy, lending a hand to a great burgeoning of Chinese arts, and poised to invest in the unique talent of its people.


China: From Cultural Revolution to Evolution through Artists

In 2007 China became a founding contracting party to the UNESCO Convention on the Protection and Promotion of Diversity of Cultural Expressions drafted in 2005. China is recognized by UNESCO as an active participant in leading the Convention's advancement and implementation in China and around the world, particularly in emerging nations. The Convention serves to recognize the influential role played by cultural and creative policies in seeking to foster peace, social cohesion and sustainable development.

This Convention was the center piece of a high-powered international forum entitled INCLUSIVENESS, OPENNESS AND INNOVATION: Respecting Cultural Diversity, Promoting Dialogue Among Cultures organized in October 2013 by the China Shanghai International Arts Festival as part of its 15th anniversary. The forum, with a particular focus on the power of festivals in advancing these ideals, brought together scholars, administrators, and policy-makers from throughout China and around the world to share principles and practices in the advancement of respect for cultural diversity. Most notable among forum participants were Danielle Cliche, Secretary of the UNESCO Convention, Jonathan Mills, Executive Director Edinburgh International Festival and internationally acclaimed composer, Tan Dun. Our International Festival of Arts & Ideas was invited to join these luminaries to share our model for programming as a global example of inclusivity and respect for diverse cultural expression.

My five days as a delegate to the Shanghai Festival was the center-piece of a visit devoted to better understanding opportunities to build U.S.-China cooperation in advancing the arts. This exploration opened up opportunities for deeper insights thanks to overlapping travel with Yale-China Association Director, Nancy Yao Maasbach and her Yale-China team. The trip was at the same time enlightening, encouraging, and bewildering yet important as we [the International Festival of Arts & Ideas] consider the changing world around us and our Festival's future as it looks to begin its third decade.

To understand the context of the visit, first let's take a look at the UNESCO Convention that served as the springboard for the forum.

What is the Convention? (according to the UNESCO website)

The Convention on the Protection and Promotion of the Diversity of Cultural Expressions is a legally-binding international agreement that ensures artists, cultural professionals, practitioners and citizens worldwide can create, produce, disseminate and enjoy a broad range of cultural goods, services and activities, including their own. It was adopted because the international community signalled the urgency for the implementation of international law that would recognise:

    • The distinctive nature of cultural goods, services and activities as vehicles of identity, values and meaning;
    • That while cultural goods, services and activities have important economic value, they are not mere commodities or consumer goods that can only be regarded as objects of trade.

Recognizing that culture can no longer be just a by-product of development, but rather the mainspring for sustainable development, the Convention ushers in a new international framework for the governance and management of culture…


Why would China, not just sign on to this Convention, but lead its global advancement? The cynics might say its timing points to China’s attempt to generate warm feelings and tourism during the 2008 Beijing Olympics. Or perhaps it is an effort to distract global attention from its human rights track record. I would suggest that as with most things in China, the answer is both more complex and profound with no clear answer rather just many essential questions to consider. Intentions seem best learned through observation of actions than through commitments to any particular covenants.

To date, 132 countries and the European Union have agreed to the tenets of this Convention. The U.S. is not among them.

Zhang Jiangang (Council Member and Deputy Director of Research Center for Cultural Policy at the Chinese Academy of Social Science), a scholar and inter-ministerial policy influencer, speaking at the recent forum said China should do two things as a contracting party of the 2005 Convention:

  1. Proceed with Cultural Reform within China and step up rapid development of cultural and creative industries; and
  2. Advance wide-ranging cooperation in the international cultural market and policies.

While discussion around promotion of cultural diversity begins with an eye toward putting culture at the center of diplomacy in pursuit of peace and understanding, comments like those of Mr. Zhang’s quoted here move the dialogue quickly toward economic development and balance of trade issues abandoning the higher ideals.

Yet to the credit of Shanghai Festival organizers the artistic programming for the 15th Festival included many projects co-created with international partners and artists. A number of these offered opportunities for young artists to work together with professionals from other countries and for emerging Chinese artists to reconnect with their own history and heritage through contemporary contexts framing multi-disciplinary performances.

A good example of a Festival project that attempted to represent the themes of inclusivity, cross-cultural respect and promotion was Shalom Shanghai, a new musical by a Chinese writer, directed by American theater director Lee Breuer and composer Eve Beglarian. It tells the story of Jewish refugees in Shanghai at the end of World War II and was performed with a mixed company of western professionals and students of the Shanghai Theater Academy.

The most profound artistic statement in the Festival’s programs also was the most impactful reflection of the Festival’s theme. It was a commission from Tan Dun of an emotional new work performed by the Shanghai Symphony for 13 micro-films, harp and orchestra called Nu Shu: The Secret Songs of Women. This work featured a unique women’s only language passed down from generation to generation found exclusively in Northern China in Jiangyong County, Hunan Province near the composer’s birthplace. Internationally acclaimed composer Tan Dun, known widely as the Academy Award winner for the score of the ground-breaking film Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon spent 5 years researching in preparation for this work.

In a time when women were barred from formal education, Nu Shu was devised as a private script passed down from mother to daughter through embroidered texts and songs. It is one of the few languages that is sung and not spoken, and the only known language to be gender-specific.

As China’s landscape becomes increasingly urbanized, Nu Shu, along with many other rural ethnic traditions, is at risk of extinction. Tan Dun traveled to Hunan to film the last known custodians of the language singing in Nu Shu and used the footage to create 13 “micro” films to pair with the music. A project of preservation, Tan Dun’s new work gives a fading language new life. The women of Nu Shu traveled to Shanghai for the premiere. The project was commissioned by an international collection of acclaimed orchestra’s including Japan’s NHK Symphony Orchestra, The Philadelphia Orchestra, and the Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra in Amsterdam.

Tan Dun, who was among the first graduates at the end of the Cultural Revolution from the prestigious Central Conservatory of Music in Beijing, has gone on to enjoy international critical acclaim as well as financial success. He is a triumphant hero in China appearing on the covers of popular magazines and lauded by many. With this latest composition, he is spreading the diversity of China’s cultures to the world and fulfilling the hunger for Chinese traditional arts evident in many of the Festival offerings and audiences. It is no coincidence that Tan Dun was named UNESCO Global Ambassador in 2013. He is a cultural icon and a role model.

 

Beyond the Festival

While the China Shanghai International Arts Festival programs may not have all been of consistent quality with some projects missing the mark for a world class performing arts festival, its ambition to demonstrate a commitment to history, heritage and international collaboration were well represented in its programming. Projects, in some cases seemed to be well received by local audiences, but eluded international visitors who did not have the context of Chinese histories and traditions that were being explored in a contemporary context. Yet even these were thrilling to witness as we saw the commitment to the values embodied in the UNESCO Convention play out onstage and in front of enthusiastic audiences.

In addition to the performances and forum, the Festival even hosted a western style showcase and trade show featuring a wide range of Chinese and international performers available to presenters for future performances throughout China. These wrap around activities to the Festival programming for the general public targeted at cultural professionals advanced the market place opportunities also embedded in the themes of the Convention.

The China Shanghai International Arts Festival is undoubtedly impactful in numerous ways; however, there are projects underway throughout China that indicate a much broader purpose.

The contemporary art scene in China is on fire with recent reports claiming that the Chinese art market is now the world's largest surpassing the U.S. The rising wealth and hunger for luxury items of the Chinese upper class has fueled much of this rapid growth and nowhere is it more evident than in Beijing's influential arts district 798. I was fortunate enough to visit a top gallery director in the district with our Yale-China colleagues and was asked to participate in a Sun TV documentary with camera crew following us on our visit to record our reactions.

In the late ‘90’s Beijing’s Central Academy of Fine Arts looking for cheap and sizable workshop space to accommodate its growing program turned to a rundown post-industrial military factory complex now known as the chic global arts center 798. At the time the property owned by Seven Stars Investments were happy to just have some revenue from this decaying array of Bauhaus-inspired factory buildings that were the remnants of a Chinese-Russian mid-century collaboration to build military electronics and equipment.

The attention of the Central Academy of Fine Arts drew artists from across China and abroad to the district creating a nuisance for both the landlord and the Chinese government who attempted to limit activities in order to discourage artistic growth in this now prime real estate poised between downtown Beijing and the airport. Until finally in 2001, interestingly the year China was admitted to the World Trade Organization, it attracted the attention of Robert Bernell. Mr. Bernell, a Sino-phile Texan who fell in love with China in college and moved to Hong Kong to find his wealth in investment banking, saw an opportunity to invest in the district while bringing to life Timezone 8 publisher, bookstore and overall promoter of Chinese artists to the world.

Mr. Bernell’s investment in the district and success in capturing the attention of the world’s art markets for Chinese artists caught the Chinese government by surprise. Bernell was excited by the energy of contemporary Chinese artists and believed strongly in the need for Beijing to be seen on a par with other international art cities. In Bernell’s view, "Beijing is a global city, and needs to be able to take part in the global discourse. There are artists here with strong messages, and they need to be able to communicate those messages in a viable way." Bernell’s Timezone 8 is doing just that. By 2009 threats of closure of 798 from the government and property owners, turned into government protection and investment in the district along with funding for the now prestigious Beijing Biennale. Mr. Bernell and many others believe that these actions send a signal to the world about a changing appreciation within China of the importance of the country’s home grown talent and a growing respect for arts and culture along the lines of what we witnessed in Shanghai.

While at 798 I had the opportunity to visit with the Tong Juanjuan, Director of Hive Center for Contemporary Art, one of the top two most successful prestigious galleries in the district. She was remarkably calm it being just two days before a big blockbuster exhibit was to open. Her office and the gallery spaces were abuzz with the usual activity you would see in a typical gallery before a high profile opening. Lots of painting and carpentry to prepare the walls. Crates and ladders scattered about waiting to be opened prepped and hung. Staff buzzing about with stylish clothes and a symmetrical hair.

We went out for a bit of lunch and a tour of the district (film crew in tow). While at lunch she got a call from a high powered artist represented in the show. The call left her distracted and apologetic saying that there was some communication in the media about the show that had upset the artist. Well certainly that is a situation anyone who has dealt with artists can relate to. But upon returning to the gallery and seeing military guards on hand for the unpacking of the art crates, given recent news reports about censorship I couldn't help but wonder if there was something more happening. Juanjuan scurried into her office and we never got to say goodbye.

An informal meeting the next day with a Beijing based real estate developer seemed to further confirm Chinese commitment to investing in culture as a central economic development policy. He revealed yet a new emerging district in the over –populated capital city identified by artists who can no longer afford to be in posh 798. This developer shared a prototype for a government backed plan to invest in a village of amenities and resources around this newly found artist’s “squatter” colony with a focus on design and fashion to compliment the already arrived creatives who have decided that this is the “next great place to be”. Driven by well-developed technology and tested manufacturing heft, this developer spoke of marrying design and output in a way that could move China’s industrial economy to an economy of ideas. With artists of all disciplines living in the district, fashion design fueled by 3 D printer technology and other advanced manufacturing techniques could move garment mass production to Chinese designed haut couture reinforcing the value of ideas, intellectual property and creative cultures.

I was able to see this kind of development first hand. Shanghai’s West Bund Biennale, a temporary art installation of massive proportion on view this fall, transforms an abandoned mid-century cement factory and fuel storage facility into a major exhibition of architecture and contemporary art that celebrates and engages the world’s avant-garde. The exhibition which celebrates Chinese architectural history is an extraordinary showcase of interdisciplinary experimental work combining sound, video, music and avant-garde theater in an atmosphere intended to be an incubator for new ideas. With construction sites encircling this temporary exhibit on prime real estate along the Huangpu River, one can already see the beginnings of Shanghai’s next major destination neighborhood. In fact, the troops of construction workers emerging from the nearby subway station at the close of day to work through the night make it feel as if the development will appear in the blink of an eye. None of this takes into consideration the significant investments domestically and internationally in entertainment and media. Variety reported this year that China’s entertainment and media markets are growing at rates of 40% to 65% per year. Joint ventures between U.S. and European media companies and Chinese partners are growing almost as rapidly. Most notable was this year’s majority stake investment by China’s Sun Innovation acquiring 70% of the ground-breaking special effects LA firm Digital Domain, producers of the much anticipated live action film Ender’s Game. Digital Domain with its new investors (which includes our Beijing arts/fashion center developer) have developed award-winning performance capture and virtual production studios that offers unparalleled feature film and videogame production expertise in the performance-driven facial and motion capture pipeline. This technology has also made possible this year live onstage performances of resurrected pop stars like Teresa Teng and Tupac Shakur. In fact, Tupac in hologram appeared with Dr. Dre to open California’s famed Coachella music festival singing a number of hits solo and collaborating with the still living Dr. Dre in a few selections.

Development and growth moves quickly in China and there is great curiosity and interest in the American ability to garner energy from friction that comes from our nation’s diversity. The lessons of how this contributes to our civil society as well as commercial, artistic and diplomatic ventures globally are worth sharing. As Ambassador Gary Locke said to the Yale School of Management’s CEO Global Summit gathering I attended, what benefits China's economy also benefits the U.S. Our nations' futures are inter-connected, and we should always be aware of this as we consider investments and policies.

It is clear that there are lessons to be learned from China as it grapples with its post-industrial realities and attempt to put culture at the center of a sustainable economy. Yet the recent attacks in Tiananmen Square by ethnic minorities remind us that promoting and respecting cultural diversity, and indeed all diversity, is an essential element in any society. Recent reports of forgeries and price manipulation in the art market destabilizing the value of traditional and contemporary Chinese art in the world market points to the need for commitment to authenticity as well as freedom of expression and markets. Whether these ideals can be implemented in a universal and tangible way is yet to be seen.

Hans-Georg Knopp, Senior Research Fellow at the Hertie School of Governance for International Cultural Policy summed it up well in his talk at the forum … Berlin: Sexy and Poor: “There is a gap between cultural policy and cultural practitioners. To be successful we must fill that gap.”

What we witness in China at this point with regard to this gap is policy makers and their financing partners focused on "cultural markets" and “industrial cultural villages”. Yet it is in the passion of the practitioners—everyday people striving to be artists, arts administrators, and students of art interested in bridging their history and talents to the future—that we see hope. If China is to be the cultural force in the world it hungers to be, it is these voices that will get it there by giving strength and credibility to what is uniquely Chinese and relevant in today's world.

Over the past 18 years the International Festival of Arts & Ideas has been working person to person to advance opportunities for artists and thinkers by connecting them to audiences and community. The results speak for itself in terms of community building, civic engagement, artistic and intellectual outcomes as well as economic impact coming from the work of our Festival. Our record is the reason we were tapped to present our model to the international forum at the Shanghai Festival.

For the past 18 months I have been serving on an arts advisory committee to Yale-China Association helping to design an arts residency program that would welcome emerging Chinese artists of all disciplines into our Yale-New Haven community for an immersive six months of interaction with Yale's professional art schools as well as artists in the region. It is our hope that person to person we can learn from these young artists how to support the future of artistic Chinese partnerships. And likewise, they will see the opportunities in knowing us and themselves more deeply and directly. This kind of person to person development has been the hallmark of Yale-China’s successes in education and public health in China for over 100 years. Together we might just have an opportunity to put artists at the center, if not in China widely, at least in our work together in advancing the human condition.

Yale-China: Reports from Fellows
 

Reports from Fellows

A key component of personal growth and cultural fluency is reflection; as such, all Yale-China Fellows are required to submit five teaching reports each year: two field reports, two teaching reports, and one Chinese report. These reports also provide colorful insight into the fellowship experience, and we are pleased to be able to periodically share new reports in this space.

Yale-China: Yale-China Site Map
 

Yale-China Site Map

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Yale-China: Yali Society
 

Yali Society

In 2013, we launched the Yali Society, an alumni association serving former Yale-China Teaching Fellows and students. The goals of the Yali Society are simple: strengthen the Yale-China community, connect current and past Fellows, and support the great work done by Yale-China. We'll work to meet these goals through informal gatherings, organized outings, and mentorship opportunities.

Yali Society is organized into regional chapters led by volunteer alumni. The eight cities where we have organized chapters are listed below. Former Fellows and students who live in one of these geographic areas are encouraged to reach out to their regional coordinator; there will also be general opportunities for mentoring, program support, and career networking over the course of the year.

The work of the Yali Society is already being done in classrooms and coffee shops around the world, and we are now simply giving it a name. We're already planning potluck dinners and museum tours in cities around the globe, and we hope you can join us to meet and reconnect with your fellow Yale-China alumni.

The work of the Yali Society is currently being coordinated by Ming Thompson, a Teaching Fellow at Yali Middle School in 2004-2006 and current Trustee of the Yale-China Association.

The Yale-China staff contact for the Yali Society is Brendan Woo, a Teaching Fellow at Xiuning Middle School in 2008-2010 and current Senior Program Officer for Education at the Yale-China Association. If you know Fellows or students who should be included in our list, or if you would like more information about the Yali Society, please contact Brendan at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

Re-Connect

Anyone in our community is encouraged to send contact information updates to .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) at any time. If you would like more information about Yali Society happenings in a specific area, reach out to one of the regional coordinators listed below.

Regional Coordinators

The following volunteers coordinate the activities of the Yali Society’s regional chapters.  Feel free to reach out to them if you are in the area.

  • Boston: Veronica Hu (.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address))
  • Chicago: Aaron Lichtig and Caroline Grossman (.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address))
  • DC Area: Hugh Sullivan (.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address))
  • Hong Kong: Andrew Fennell (.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address))
  • New Haven: Jess Marsden (.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address))
  • New York: Kelly Brooks (.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address))
  • San Francisco: John Tang (.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address))
  • Twin Cities: Jan Kleinman (.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address))



The Yali Society also provides mentors for current Fellows; this effort is also coordinated by a volunteer former Fellow, Alexa Verme.  If you are interested in mentoring a current Fellow, please contact her at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

About the Logo

The Yali Society logo was created by former Fellow and Yale-China Trustee Ming Thompson. It incorporates the depiction of Hsiang-ya (Xiangya) Hospital – one of Yale-China's earliest endeavors in both health and education – from the Yale-in-China logo, which was in use before the organization changed its name to Yale-China Association in 1975. This component emphasizes the longevity of the Yale-China tradition and reminds us of the Changsha roots of our work.

The Chinese calligraphy in the logo was executed by Cheng Hao (程浩), a student at Xiuning Middle School in Anhui Province. Xiuning Middle School was the newest site in the Yale-China fellowship portfolio at the time the Yali Society logo was created, and the youth of both the calligrapher and this institutional relationship symbolizes the vision that the work of the Yali Society will carry on into the future even while drawing on the past.

The use of both English and Chinese in the logo represents the two-way exchange of teachers and students – whether American or Chinese – that continues long after these individuals have completed their direct involvement with the Yale-China program.

The name "Yali" is drawn from the Chinese name of Yale-China, Yali Xiehui (雅礼协会), and is derived from the transliteration of "Yale" that was in use at the time of Yale-China's founding in 1901.

For more information on the history of the Yale-China Association, click here.

Yale-China: Latest News
 

Latest News

Find the latest news and announcements from Yale-China here, along with mentions of our work and of our community in the press.

YaleNews
Yale Daily News
Youtube
New Haven Independent

Yale-China: Changing Times, Changing Names
 

Changing Times, Changing Names

The Yale-China Association was first incorporated as the Yale Foreign Missionary Society, and was known informally as Yale-in-China as early as 1913. It was nondenominational from its beginnings and by the 1920's had ceased to be an overtly missionary enterprise. It was re-incorporated in 1934 as a secular organization, the Yale-in-China Association, and in 1975 as the Yale-China Association.

1901 - 1951

A reflection of the religious fervor sweeping American college campuses at the end of the 19th century, Yale-China was founded in 1901 as the Yale Foreign Missionary Society by a group of Yale graduates and faculty members committed to establishing a Christian missionary presence overseas. The founders chose China as the focus of their work, in part to honor the memory of a Yale graduate from the class of 1892, Horace Tracy Pitkin, who had worked in China as a missionary and died in 1900 during the Boxer Rebellion. The city of Changsha in Hunan Province was chosen as the base of operations in China after consultation with other foreign missionaries.

At the urging of the home office in New Haven as well as other missionaries in China, the Yale Mission early on assumed more of an educational than evangelical function. With the arrival of Dr. Edward Hume in 1905, medical education and care became a major focus of the endeavor. The educational compound that began with Dr. Hume's medical clinic eventually grew to comprise a preparatory school, the Yali Middle School; the College of Yale-in-China (later moved to Wuhan, where it joined two other missionary colleges to form Huachung University); and the Hsiang-Ya Medical College, Nursing School and Hospital. Over the years, Hsiang-Ya (a compound of hsiang, denoting Hunan, and ya, denoting Yale-China; transliterated today as Xiangya) developed a reputation for providing the most advanced training in Western medicine in all of central and southern China. More than at other foreign-affiliated institutions, an effort was made early on to bring as many Chinese faculty and administrators on board as possible. By the late 1920's, all major leadership positions were held by Chinese, and Yale-in-China was very much a joint Sino-American enterprise.

The war years (1937-45) placed enormous strains on the Yale-in-China institutions, especially the Hsiang-Ya Hospital, which cared for the seemingly limitless war casualties and refugees. As the Chinese Nationalist armies retreated towards the southwest, these institutions followed to escape the advancing Japanese. In July of 1938, Huachung University moved to Guilin, but bombing raids there forced it to move to Xizhou in the remote reaches of Yunnan province the following year. Yali Middle School moved to Yuanling in western Hunan in September of 1938 and the medical college and nursing school moved to Guiyang, in Guizhou, the following month.

Yale-in-China's wartime experiences were difficult, and many of the Changsha facilities were damaged by invading Japanese troops. Nevertheless, these challenges served to inspire renewed commitment on the part of both American and Chinese faculty and administrators. The Yale-in-China staff who returned to Changsha in September of 1945 were determined to rebuild the campus and resume their pre-war operations. Within four years, however, a Communist insurgency toppled the Nationalist government and Yale-in-China's future seemed uncertain in the face of growing hostility between the United States and China.

By 1951, the new Communist government had taken possession of Yale-in-China's Changsha properties and renamed the Yali Middle School as "Liberation Middle School." Dr. Dwight Rugh, Yale-in-China's last representative in Changsha, spent most of 1950 under house arrest as the only American on campus, and was eventually expelled from China in May of 1951. With his departure, the ties between Yale-in-China in New Haven and the institutions in Changsha and Wuhan were broken for nearly 30 years.

1951-1979

Between 1951 and 1954, hostility against the United States on the mainland and turmoil on Nationalist-held Taiwan led to a suspension of Yale-in-China’s work within China. During those years, Yale-in-China devoted its resources to financing the education of Chinese students in the U.S. while looking in Asia for new projects to support. Attention soon focused on a refugee college in the British colony of Hong Kong which had been founded by Ch’ien Mu (1895-1990) and other Chinese intellectuals determined to preserve traditional Chinese learning and values in the face of the Communist victory on the mainland. In early 1954, after a visit to the colony and months of negotiations, Yale-in-China’s trustees formally affiliated the organization with New Asia College.



Unlike in Changsha, Yale-in-China’s relationship with New Asia College was, by intention, one of support and assistance rather than direct administration. Yale-in-China secured funding from the Ford Foundation and other U.S. foundations to support the development of the college, and also provided fellowships for New Asia faculty to pursue further study in the United States. In 1956, Yale-in-China resumed the practice of sending two recent Yale graduates each year to teach English, though now to New Asia College instead of Yali Middle School.



In the late 1950s, the possibility of founding a university in Hong Kong that would use Chinese as the medium of instruction was explored. In 1959, the Council of British Universities selected New Asia, United and Chung Chi colleges to federate and form the new Chinese University of Hong Kong, which was formally inaugurated in 1963 on its Shatin campus. Yale-in-China contributed to the new campus by securing funds to construct numerous buildings, including the university health clinic, the Yali Guest House, Friendship Lodge and a student dormitory at New Asia College. Yale-in-China also contributed to the early internationalization of the campus by helping to establish the New Asia—Yale-in-China Chinese Language Centre and the International Asian Studies Program, which now enroll hundreds of international students every year. Meanwhile, the relationship with New Asia College, where the Yale-China Association (as the organization was renamed in 1975) has maintained a representative office for fifty years, remains a strong one.

1979-Present

By the 1970s, both New Asia College and the Chinese University of Hong Kong had achieved a level of institutional maturity and financial stability that decreased the need for Yale-China's contributions. At the same time, the normalization of diplomatic relations between the U.S. and China presented the possibility of resumed activity on the mainland. In the fall of 1979, Yale-China staff traveled to Changsha to explore opportunities for academic exchange with administrators and faculty at Hunan Medical College, the successor to Hsiang-Ya, and several exchange agreements were concluded that led to the arrival of Yale-China English teachers in September of 1980 and exchanges of medical personnel between Yale University and Hunan Medical College. Two English instructors were also sent to Wuhan University the same year and later to Huazhong Normal University.

Despite the geographical continuities, however, the intervening years had brought substantial changes to Chinese higher education and within Yale-China itself. Political sensitivities in China and Yale-China's own evolution determined that any new activity in China would be of a nature substantially different from that of the pre-1949 years. Rather than seeking to resume the joint administration of the former Yale-in-China institutions, the emphasis was placed on shorter-term academic exchanges in the fields of medicine and American Studies and a resumption of the English language instruction program. Throughout the 1980s, Yale-China's medical program brought almost 50 Chinese medical personnel to the U.S. and sent over 40 Americans to China for exchanges of medical knowledge. During the same years, nearly 100 Yale graduates participated in Yale-China's English teaching program in China. Yale-China also continued to send English teachers to the Chinese University of Hong Kong and maintained its involvement with the university's International Asian Studies Program.

The decade of the 1990s brought an expansion of Yale-China's activities into new program areas and affiliations with institutions outside of Yale-China's historical bases in Hong Kong, Changsha and Wuhan. While maintaining its English teaching program, Yale-China initiated projects in environmental protection and pediatric cardiology and facilitated a drama collaboration between New Haven's Long Wharf Theater and the Shanghai People's Art Theater which resulted in a Chinese-language stage production of Amy Tan's The Joy Luck Club in 1994. Other areas of expansion have included the fields of American Studies, legal education, public health, nursing, and service in the non-profit sector for China and American students. Information on current programs appears on the programs section of this website.

Yale-China: Trustee Contact Information
 

Trustee Contact Information

FY2014 Trustees

Brooks, Martha Finn
Address: 1775 S. Ponce de Leon Avenue, Atlanta, GA 30307
Phone: 404-370-8053
E-mail: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Davis, Deborah S.
Address: 38 Pearl Street, New Haven, CT 06511
Phone: 203-624-0308
E-mail: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Fennie, Kristopher P.
Address: 100 Edgewater Drive, #327, Miami, FL 33133
Phone: 203-623-8311
E-mail: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Ferguson, Douglas M.
Address: 94 Moffat Road, Waban, MA 02468-1115
Phone: 617-332-1691
E-mail: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Harpole, Sally A.
Address: Sally Harpole & Co, PO Box 12153, General Post Office, Hong Kong
Phone: 852-2526-2302
E-mail: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Hu, Fred
Address: Suite 1001, China World Tower 1, Chaoyang District, Beijing, China
Phone:
E-mail: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Kiely, Jan F.
Address: Room 704, 7/F Hui Yeung Shing Building, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, New Territories, Hong Kong
Phone: 852-9081-5725
E-mail: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Liang, Ping
Address: AlphaMax Advisors LLC, 8011 Wilderness Trail, Ada, MI 49301
Phone: 616-682-9868
E-mail: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Ling, Vivian
Address: 3326 S. Oaklawn Circle, Bloomington, IN 47401
Phone: 805-967-3896
E-mail: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Ma, Max
Address: 7th Online, Inc., 24 West 40th Street, New York, NY 10018
Phone: 212-997-1717
E-mail: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Murck, Christian F.
Address: Ta Yuan, Apt. 1-1-102, Xindong Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100600, China
Phone: +86-10-6532-7829
E-mail: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Phan, Pamela Phuong N.
Address: Lecturer in Law, Stanford Law School, Crown Quadrangle, 559 Nathan Abbott Way, Stanford, CA 94305-8610
Phone: 650- 724-1450
E-mail: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Plattus, Alan J.
Address: School Of Architecture, 180 York Street, New Haven, CT 06511-8924
Phone: 203-432-2290
E-mail: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Reynolds, Nancy R.
Address: 558 Chapel Street, New Haven, CT 06511
Phone: 203-773-1980
E-mail: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Rohrbaugh, Robert M.
Address: Yale University School of Medicine, 300 George Street, Ste. 901, Rm 24, New Haven, CT 06511
Phone: 203-785-2089
E-mail: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Sandweiss, Katherine L.
Address: 2515 Lake Place, Minneapolis, MN 55405-2476
Phone: 612-377-6840
E-mail: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Stein, Peter M.
Address: Apt. 3A Well View Villa, 17 Tung Shan Terrace, Stubbs Road, Hong Kong
Phone: 852-6680-1963
E-mail: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Tang, Henry S.
Address: Committee of 100, 673 Fifth Avenue, 5th Floor, New York, NY 10022
Phone: 917-553-7750
E-mail: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Tang, Qinan
Address: 1214 5th Avenue, Apt. 33C, New York, NY 10029
Phone: 917-428-8596
E-mail: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Thompson, Ming
Address: 5820 MLK Jr. Way, Oakland, CA 94609
Phone: 276-336-0463
E-mail: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Wheeler, Mary Gwen
Address: Louisville Metro Hall, 527 West Jefferson Street, Suite 203, Louisville, KY 40202
Phone: 502-574-6285
E-mail: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Williams, Ann B.
Address: Office of Research, 10880 Wilshire Boulevard, Suite 550, Los Angeles, CA 90024
Phone: 310-208-3585
E-mail: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Wishnie, Michael J.
Address: 272 Edgehill Road, Hamden, CT 06517
Phone: 203-773-0090
E-mail: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Wu, Barry J.
Address: 235 East 22nd St., Apt. 8S, New York, NY 10010
Phone: 203-466-3243
E-mail: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Yale-China: Committees
 

Committees

Committees Membership 2014-2015
Below is a list of complete committee assignments. Please contact .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) if you would like to be added or removed from any committee.

Permanent Committees

Executive Committee
Martha Finn Brooks – Chair
Deborah Davis – Vice Chair
Douglas Ferguson
Christian Murck
Katherine Sandweiss
Michael Wishnie
Staff: Nancy Yao Maasbach

Audit Committee
Ping Liang – Chair
Kristopher Fennie
Jan Kiely
Qinan Tang
Staff: Jonathan Green, Nancy Yao Maasbach

Development Committee
Douglas Ferguson – Co-Chair
Christian Murck – Co-Chair
Nancy Reynolds
Peter Stein
Henry Tang
Ming Thompson
Mary Gwen Wheeler
Staff: Bill Peng, Nancy Yao Maasbach

Finance Committee
Kate Sandweiss – Chair
Martha Finn Brooks
Joan Channick
Douglas Ferguson
Ping Liang
Xizhou Zhou
Staff: Jonathan Green, Nancy Yao Maasbach

Nominating and Governance Committee
Michael Wishnie – Chair
Sally Harpole
Robert Rohrbaugh
Katherine Sandweiss
Ann Williams
Staff: Jonathan Green, Nancy Yao Maasbach

Advisory Committees

*Non-Trustee

Arts Committee
Alan Plattus – Chair
Martha Finn Brooks
Joan Channick
Fred Hu
Ping Liang
Peter Stein
Ming Thompson
*Mary Lou Aleskie
*Robert Blocker
*Kurt Chan Yuk-Keung
*Ivo Kaltchev
*Perry So
*Eric Ting
*Juanjuan Tong
*Jian Yi
Staff: Annie Lin, Nancy Yao Maasbach 

Education Committee
Deborah Davis - Chair
Jan Kiely
Christian Murck
Katherine Sandweiss
Ming Thompson
Anita Wang
Mary Gwen Wheeler
Xizhou Zhou
Staff: Leslie Stone, Brendan Woo

     Chinese Teaching Fellowship Sub-committee
     *Vivian Ling
     Mary Gwen Wheeler
     Michael Wishnie
     Staff: Leslie Stone, Brendan Woo

Health Committee
Kristopher Fennie – Chair
Nancy Reynolds
Robert Rohrbaugh
Ann Williams
Barry Wu
*Susan Forster
*Kaveh Khoshnood
*Hong Wang
Staff: Michael Packevicz, Lucy Yang

Leadership and Service Committee
no members

     Law Subcommittee
     Sally Harpole
     Mike Wishnie

Yale-China: Board Meeting Minutes
 
Yale-China: Governance
 

Governance

The governance policies of the Yale-China Association are available as a PDF in its entirety here. You may also view by section below.

Contents

Role of Trustee
By-laws
       •  Article I: Members
       •  Article II: Trustees
       •  Article III: Committees
       •  Article IV: Officers and Staff
       •  Article V: Amendments
Code of Ethics
Conflict of Interest Policy & Questionnaire
Confidentiality Policy
Whistleblower Policy
Record Retention Policy
Gift Acceptance Policy
Unrestricted Gift Acceptance Policy

Yale-China: Board Meeting Information
 

Board Meeting Information

Dates and Location

Thursday, June 19, 2014:
Yale-China Association, 442 Temple Street
New Haven, CT 06511
12:30PM-8:00PM

Friday, June 20, 2014:
Yale-China Association, 442 Temple Street
New Haven, CT 06511
8:00AM-12:00PM

Board Materials

Download the board book here.

Please feel free to contact .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) for any other board meeting logistics.

Lodging


If you are interested in sharing a room with a fellow trustee, contact .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address). Otherwise, please book your accommodations directly with the hotel of your choice.
Omni Hotel
Marriott Courtyard New Haven at Yale
The Study at Yale
New Haven Hotel

Yale-China: Announcements
 

Announcements

Welcome to the "Resources for Trustees" portion of our website.

Please note that these pages include contact and biographical information on you and your fellow trustees. We would appreciate it if you would take a few moments to review your information and to read through document Role of Trustee. Please send .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) any changes, edits, or additions to your contact information or bio.

Thank you for your time and, as always, we would welcome any feedback or suggestions you might have for these pages or for the rest of our website.

To log off of the trustee password-protected area of this site, please click on "log out" on the navigation to the right.

Board Meeting and Brunch Brainstorming Session

The June 2014 Board Meeting will be held on Thursday, June 19 and Friday, June 20, 2014. For more information, click here. There will also be a brunch brainstorming session with Teaching Fellows from the last 15 years held on Saturday, June 21 , from 12:00PM - 4:00PM.

Yale-China Conference-From the Secret Language to Modern Voices: the Changing Role of Women in Modern China

The conference is scheduled for Monday, April 14 2014 from 11:00AM-6:00PM at the Omni New Haven Hotel at Yale, 155 Temple Street, New Haven, CT. It will feature a keynote performance of Tan Dun's Nu Shu: the Secret Songs of Women. Alongside the keynote performance the conference will also feature Elizabeth Hainen (Principal Harpist), The Philadelphia Orchestra, and Qu Yajun (Director, Women Culture Museum). For more information contact .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

Lunarfest 2014 - Lion Dance

Lunarfest 2014 was success on February 1, 2014. For photos of the event click here.

Yale-China: Xiuning Service and Cultural Exchange Program 2011
 

Xiuning Service and Cultural Exchange Program 2011

The following is a sample schedule of a day’s activities from the 2011 program:

Tuesday, July 12, 2011
Xiuning
7:00 AM Breakfast at Smoky Willow
8:00 AM Depart for work sites
8:30 AM Morning work session #1
9:30 AM Morning work session #2
10:30 AM Morning work session #3
11:30 AM Finish work; board buses
11:45 AM Depart for Smoky Willow
12:00 PM Lunch at Smoky Willow
1:30 PM Board buses, return to work sites
2:00 PM Afternoon work session
5:00 PM Finish work; board buses
5:30 PM Arrive at Smoky Willow
6:00 PM Dinner at Smoky Willow
7:00 PM Depart for pen pal party at middle school
8:30 PM Early bus returns to Smoky Willow
9:00 PM All buses return to Smoky Willow

Yale-China: Yale-China Nonprofit Internship Program – The Women’s Foundation
 

Yale-China Nonprofit Internship Program – The Women’s Foundation

About The Women’s Foundation


The Women's Foundation
www.thewomensfoundationhk.org
Location: Hong Kong
Number of Interns:  1
Language Requirement:  None

The Women's Foundation is a non-profit organization established in 2004 and dedicated to improving the lives of women and girls in Hong Kong through ground-breaking research, impactful and innovative community programs, and education, media engagement and advocacy. Our three key focus areas are challenging gender stereotypes, increasing the number of women in decision-making and leadership positions, and empowering women in poverty to achieve a better quality of life for themselves and their families.

Internship Description

The Women’s Foundation’s internship program is suitable for those who are dedicated to women's empowerment and learning about gender issues in a local and global context. A strong feature of the the Foundation's internship experience is a specially tailored program for each intern. Different abilities and interests are taken into account to maximize the benefits of the internship for both the student and the Foundation.

There are two key areas under which the foundation carries out its work:

  • Fundraising & Development – research fundraising sources, drafting grant proposals, assisting to organize and execute events
  • Research & Communications – conduct background research, help to develop advocacy plans, utilise social media platforms

Previous interns conducted research, helped script panels, corresponded with donors, managed donor databases and social media platforms, helped organize media briefings, assisted in executing events for corporate and public audiences, and worked on grant proposals and reports.

Funding

All Yale-China Nonprofit Interns receive a travel grant to help pay for airfare to China and defray the cost of living expenses. Housing and visa support is also provided, as is the cost of the End-of-Summer Service Project. Interns are responsible for their own personal expenses, any expenses that are not covered by the travel grant, and any costs related to health preparation and/or vaccinations.

Yale-China: Yale-China Nonprofit Internship Program – Society for Community Organization
 

Yale-China Nonprofit Internship Program – Society for Community Organization

About Society for Community Organization


Society for Community Organization
www.soco.org.hk
Location: Hong Kong
Number of Interns: 1-2
Language Requirement: Interns must be able to speak Mandarin or Cantonese to at least working proficiency. Ability to read Chinese is a plus.

SoCO is an incorporated, non-profit and non-governmental community organization. It was formed in 1972 and was financially supported by donations from churches, overseas funding bodies, the Community Chest and individuals. Through civic education programs and social actions, SoCO aims to instill a sense of civic responsibility in the grassroots people and to encourage them to fight for their own rights. SoCO also believes that solidarity among the grassroots people is crucial in the process of working towards an equal social system in Hong Kong.

Internship Description

Previous Yale-China interns have worked on the following projects:

  • Research on foreign prisoners' right to make phone calls;
  • Survey on treatment of asylum seekers;
  • Researching conditions of police holding cells in commonwealth countries;
  • Researching solitary confinement policies in various countries;
  • Translation of reports on cage homes and children’s healthcare;
  • Case study of societal integration of new immigrants;
  • Tutoring immigrant women and children in English

Interns of summer 2014 will have the chance to teach English in SoCO's community centres.

Funding

All Yale-China Nonprofit Interns receive a travel grant to help pay for airfare to China and defray the cost of living expenses. Housing and visa support is also provided, as is the cost of the End-of-Summer Service Project. Interns are responsible for their own personal expenses, any expenses that are not covered by the travel grant, and any costs related to health preparation and/or vaccinations.

Yale-China: Yale-China Nonprofit Internship Program – Helpers for Domestic Helpers
 

Yale-China Nonprofit Internship Program – Helpers for Domestic Helpers

About Helpers for Domestic Helpers


Helpers for Domestic Helpers
www.hdh-sjc.org
Number of Interns: 1
Language Requirement: English; Cantonese or Tagalog a plus but not required

Helpers for Domestic Helpers (HDH) is a St John's Cathedral pastoral outreach venture catering to the special needs of Hong Kong's foreign domestic helper (FDH) community. FDHs are predominantly women and now number well over 100,000. They come from a variety of South East Asian countries including Thailand, Indonesia, Sri Lanka, India and Bangladesh, but the vast majority are Filipinos. Filipino FDHs form a very substantial part of the Cathedral's own congregation.

Helpers for Domestic Helpers was established under the auspices of St John's Cathedral by a group of lawyers in the congregation who were concerned about the plight of FDHs. It offers advice and assistance to FDHs regardless of their nationality or religious affiliations. Its services are provided completely free of charge.

The organization’s work focuses mainly on employment and immigration problems. Terminated helpers are assisted in making labor claims and pursuing them through the processed of conciliation and adjudication in the relevant tribunals and courts. Much of the organization’s efforts are devoted to persuading the Immigration Department to allow a terminated helper to take up new employment where permission to do so has been initially refused.

Internship Description

Previous Yale-China interns have worked on the following projects:

  • Helped with general office duties, including client intake and record keeping;
  • Gave legal counsel to domestic helpers;
  • Accompanied clients to their court hearings;
  • Helped file claims to the Labor Department;
  • Assisted clients in meetings with former employers

The duties will remain the same for summer 2014. The organization looks for an intern with good writing skills for letters, witness statements and articles for newsletters. The candidate should be aware of and interested in social issues. Willingness to take initiatives and good organisation skills are also expected. This is an excellent opportunity for a student who plans to attend law school following graduation from Yale or who has a strong interest in the field.

Funding

All Yale-China Nonprofit Interns receive a travel grant to help pay for airfare to China and defray the cost of living expenses. Housing and visa support is also provided, as is the cost of the End-of-Summer Service Project. Interns are responsible for their own personal expenses, any expenses that are not covered by the travel grant, and any costs related to health preparation and/or vaccinations.

Yale-China: Yale-China Nonprofit Internship Program – Children’s Medical Foundation
 

Yale-China Nonprofit Internship Program – Children’s Medical Foundation

About Children’s Medical Foundation


Children's Medical Foundation
cmf.org.hk
Location: Hong Kong
Number of Interns: 1
Language Requirement: Mandarin Chinese skills (spoken and written) a plus, although not required

Children’s Medical Foundation (CMF) is the leading charity addressing a little-known but serious healthcare gap in rural China, where babies are 3-5 times more likely to die in their first month of life than those born in urban areas, mainly from preventable causes. Through a holistic and sustainable approach, CMF establishes lifesaving neonatal care units, trains medical professionals, and donates crucial equipment to these regions, building capacity at the front lines and giving babies a better chance at life.

Founded in 1995, CMF continues to innovate ways to improve the healthcare opportunities available to underserved populations. Past projects include establishing Shanghai Children’s Medical Center (one of China’s top pediatric hospitals), funding surgeries for children with congenital diseases, and building up neonatal care units in 12 provinces across China. Currently, CMF focuses on neonatal care projects at eight program sites in Guizhou, Sichuan, and Yunnan in southwestern China.

Internship Description

Previous Yale-China interns have:

  • Researched standards for neonatal care around the world;
  • Established links with other NGOs working in similar spheres;
  • Identified potential sponsors and compiled grant proposals;
  • Visited partner hospitals in China and Hong Kong;
  • Participated in planning and execution of fundraising events;
  • Created marketing materials, both print and online

Based in Hong Kong, CMF is a small NGO that achieves big NGO outcomes. An interest in medicine or public health, and helping children is key. The opportunity includes being immersed as a member of the team, participating in all facets of the CMF’s activities, and working closely with the organization’s leaders.

If a trip to China is planned during the internship period, you will be invited to join, but will need to cover your own visa and travel expenses.

Funding

All Yale-China Nonprofit Interns receive a travel grant to help pay for airfare to China and defray the cost of living expenses. Housing and visa support is also provided, as is the cost of the End-of-Summer Service Project. Interns are responsible for their own personal expenses, any expenses that are not covered by the travel grant, and any costs related to health preparation and/or vaccinations.

Yale-China: Yale-China Nonprofit Internship Program – Asian Migrant Centre
 

Yale-China Nonprofit Internship Program – Asian Migrant Centre

About Asian Migrant Centre


Asian Migrant Centre
www.asian-migrants.org
Location: Hong Kong
Number of Interns: 1
Language Requirement: English; Knowledge of any of the Greater Mekong Subregion languages (Vietnamese, Cambodian, Chinese, Lao, Thai, Burmese) a plus. 

Based in Hong Kong, the Asian Migrant Centre (AMC) operates as a monitoring, research, information, publishing, training, support and action center dedicated to the promotion of the human rights and empowerment of migrant workers and their families in Asia. AMC shares a common vision with migrants and advocates for the building of humane, just, pluralistic, and democratic societies founded on the principles of human rights, social justice, gender equity, non-discrimination, sustainability, and people’s participation. It believes that the pursuit of development and the conduct of social affairs should always be premised on the upholding of human dignity, strengthening of families and communities, and the promotion of each person’s full potential.

There are currently three programs at AMC: Mekong Migration Program, Migration & Development Program and Migrant Domestic Workers' Program.

Internship Description

Previous Yale-China interns have worked on the following projects:

  • Research and create map of cross-economic border zones;
  • Revise and update training modules for regional training on labor migration management for government officials;
  • Revise papers and coordinate with Country Research Teams coordinators in advance of the Mekong Migration Network conference;
  • Tutor Thai domestic helpers through the Thai Women’s Association on Sundays;
  • Assist in researching, writing, and editing a publication on Special Border Economic Zones in the Greater Mekong Region

Excellent academic writing, editing and social research skills are essential and knowledge in migration or human rights related fields (gender, labor, etc.) or in economic studies (to assist analyzing the research on cross-border economic zones) will be greatly appreciated. Interns should be willing to work independently as well as in a team. For the summer of 2014 in particular, the organization would prefer (not required) to host interns with skills in brochure layout/design, and/or webpage design and maintenance as the Centre are undergoing major website upgrades. Interns may be asked to bring their own computers to Hong Kong for this internship.

Funding

All Yale-China Nonprofit Interns receive a travel grant to help pay for airfare to China and defray the cost of living expenses. Housing and visa support is also provided, as is the cost of the End-of-Summer Service Project. Interns are responsible for their own personal expenses, any expenses that are not covered by the travel grant, and any costs related to health preparation and/or vaccinations.

Yale-China: Mental Healthcare
 

Mental Healthcare

About Marrakech (New Haven)

Marrakech is a private nonprofit organization that provides residential, educational, and job placement services to people facing economic challenges and that serves more than 1500 children and adults with developmental, physical, and behavioral health disabilities through housing, employment, and community integration services. Our mission is to provide residential, employment, support, referral, and advocacy services to people with disabilities and people with similar service needs, to assist them in exercising their human rights as citizens and as contributing members of society.

About New Life (Hong Kong)

New Life is a nonprofit welfare organization established by a group of ex-mental patients in 1959 providing rehabilitation services for recovered mental patients and also the mentally handicapped. Its mission is to establish hostels, shelters, workshops, farms, clubs or any projects on a non-profit making basis where ex-mental patients and the mentally retarded may obtain free of charge or on moderate terms temporary residential facilities, vocational training, sheltered employment, recreation or activities calculated directly or indirectly for their rehabilitation and betterment.

Internship Description

During their time at Marrakech and New Life, the interns will work directly with residents, helping to organize activities for them, as well as teaching work and life skills. 

Candidates need to be people-oriented, sensitive to cultural differences, flexible and independent. Applicants should also be enthusiastic about hosting the Hong Kong students in New Haven for part of the summer. 

Funding

Yale participants in the Community Service Exchange will receive round-trip airfare to Hong Kong, as well as free housing in both Hong Kong and New Haven. In Hong Kong the interns will stay in dormitory accommodations on the campus of New Asia College at The Chinese University of Hong Kong; in New Haven they will live together in an off-campus apartment. Students will also receive a modest stipend in both places to help defray the costs of their commuting and daily living expenses.

Yale-China: Education
 

Education

About New Haven Reads (New Haven)

The overall goal of New Haven Reads is to provide an environment where children and adults have access to free books and tutoring to increase their literacy skills and academic performance. The organization places particular emphasis on serving the most economically and educationally disadvantaged children and families who otherwise would not have access to these resources.

New Haven Reads operates a Book Bank stocked with donated books from the community. Anyone can walk in and take free books. New Haven Reads also offers free afterschool tutoring. While in New Haven, interns will live in an apartment in the East Rock neighborhood.

About New Asia Middle School (Hong Kong)

Check back for more information in fall 2012.

Internship Description

During their tenures with New Asia Middle School and New Haven Reads, the interns will plan and design English lessons, tutor local students in reading, help out with administrative tasks, and conduct a small research project.

Candidates need to be people-oriented, sensitive to cultural differences, flexible and independent. Applicants should also be enthusiastic about hosting the Hong Kong students in New Haven for part of the summer, and candidates with experience working with children and young people are especially encouraged to apply. No Chinese language skills are required, but native-speaker level English fluency is a must.

Funding

Yale participants in the Community Service Exchange will receive round-trip airfare to Hong Kong, as well as free housing in both Hong Kong and New Haven. In Hong Kong the interns will stay in dormitory accommodations on the campus of New Asia College at The Chinese University of Hong Kong; in New Haven they will live together in an off-campus apartment. Students will also receive a modest stipend in both places to help defray the costs of their commuting and daily living expenses.

Yale-China: HIV/AIDS Care and Education
 

HIV/AIDS Care and Education

About Leeway (New Haven)

Leeway, Inc. in New Haven is Connecticut's first and only skilled nursing home dedicated solely to the treatment of people living with AIDS. Since 1995, Leeway has provided compassionate, individualized medical care for more than 500 people living with HIV/AIDS. Leeway provides short- or long-term sub-acute, respite and terminal care, as well as palliative treatment. Leeway provides significant psycho-social support to its residents through substance abuse counseling, life skills training, and various support groups and activities. Leeway is committed to providing residents with a safe, nurturing environment that promotes quality of life and dignity for each individual with a focus on the integration of body, mind and spirit through mutual respect among residents and caregivers. Leeway currently has about 40 residents. While in New Haven, students will live in an apartment inside a house in the East Rock neighborhood.

About Red Ribbon Centre (Hong Kong)

Red Ribbon Centre is an AIDS education, resource and research centre established by the Department of Health, under the sponsorship of the AIDS Trust Fund, Hong Kong. Among its objectives are to promote community participation in AIDS education and research and to develop AIDS-education programs. While in Hong Kong, students will live in a dormitory on the campus of New Asia College at The Chinese University of Hong Kong.

Internship Description

During their time at Red Ribbon Centre, the interns will help to conduct public surveys related to HIV policy and patterns in Hong Kong, as well as assisting with other projects and research. At Leeway the interns will work directly with residents, helping to organize activities for them, as well as teaching work and life skills. 

Candidates need to be people-oriented, sensitive to cultural differences, flexible and independent. Applicants should also be enthusiastic about hosting the Hong Kong students in New Haven for part of the summer. Although Chinese language skills are not required for this internship, knowledge of Mandarin or Cantonese would be a plus for the intern’s work at Red Ribbon Centre in Hong Kong. 

Funding

Yale participants in the Community Service Exchange will receive round-trip airfare to Hong Kong, as well as free housing in both Hong Kong and New Haven. In Hong Kong the interns will stay in dormitory accommodations on the campus of New Asia College at The Chinese University of Hong Kong; in New Haven they will live together in an off-campus apartment. Students will also receive a modest stipend in both places to help defray the costs of their commuting and daily living expenses.

Yale-China: HIV/AIDS Care and Education
 

HIV/AIDS Care and Education

About Leeway (New Haven)

Leeway, Inc. in New Haven is Connecticut's first and only skilled nursing home dedicated solely to the treatment of people living with AIDS. Since 1995, Leeway has provided compassionate, individualized medical care for more than 500 people living with HIV/AIDS. Leeway provides short- or long-term sub-acute, respite and terminal care, as well as palliative treatment. Leeway provides significant psycho-social support to its residents through substance abuse counseling, life skills training, and various support groups and activities. Leeway is committed to providing residents with a safe, nurturing environment that promotes quality of life and dignity for each individual with a focus on the integration of body, mind and spirit through mutual respect among residents and caregivers. Leeway currently has about 40 residents. While in New Haven, students will live in an apartment inside a house in the East Rock neighborhood.

About Red Ribbon Centre (Hong Kong)

Red Ribbon Centre is an AIDS education, resource and research centre established by the Department of Health, under the sponsorship of the AIDS Trust Fund, Hong Kong. Among its objectives are to promote community participation in AIDS education and research and to develop AIDS-education programs. While in Hong Kong, students will live in a dormitory on the campus of New Asia College at The Chinese University of Hong Kong.

Internship Description

During their time at Red Ribbon Centre, the interns will help to conduct public surveys related to HIV policy and patterns in Hong Kong, as well as assisting with other projects and research. At Leeway the interns will work directly with residents, helping to organize activities for them, as well as teaching work and life skills. 

Candidates need to be people-oriented, sensitive to cultural differences, flexible and independent. Applicants should also be enthusiastic about hosting the Hong Kong students in New Haven for part of the summer. Although Chinese language skills are not required for this internship, knowledge of Mandarin or Cantonese would be a plus for the intern’s work at Red Ribbon Centre in Hong Kong. 

Funding

Yale participants in the Community Service Exchange will receive round-trip airfare to Hong Kong, as well as free housing in both Hong Kong and New Haven. In Hong Kong the interns will stay in dormitory accommodations on the campus of New Asia College at The Chinese University of Hong Kong; in New Haven they will live together in an off-campus apartment. Students will also receive a modest stipend in both places to help defray the costs of their commuting and daily living expenses.

Yale-China: Yale-China Law Fellowship – Past Work in Law
 

Yale-China Law Fellowship – Past Work in Law

Yale-China’s Previous Work in Clinical Legal Education

Yale-China's forte has long been our ability to deliver high quality, effective programs designed to meet specific and emerging needs on the ground in China. One such example is the Yale-China Law Fellows Program, which was developed in response to official and grassroots efforts to strengthen the rule of law in China. These efforts have precipitated new challenges, chief among them the need to bolster legal education so that judges and lawyers are equipped to navigate this new legal landscape. Yale-China's law program responded to this challenge by sending young U.S.-trained attorneys to China for one year to teach courses on U.S. and international legal practices and standards. Yale-China also helped to pioneer the field of clinical legal education in China, which provides one of the best avenues through which Chinese law schools can begin to foster communities of students and teachers prepared to use the law to serve the public interest.

Beginning in 2000, Yale-China appointed nine early-career U.S. lawyers as Yale-China Law Fellows, seven of whom taught in China for one academic year, and two of whom taught for longer periods. These Fellows were integrated into the educational programs of seven of China’s major law schools: Tsinghua University, Beijing; Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou; Wuhan University and South-Central University of Politics and Law, Wuhan; Northwest University of Politics and Law, Xi’an; Yunnan University, Kunming; and Hunan University, Changsha.

The goals and objectives of this program were:

  • To foster understanding and cooperation involving students and faculty members of the Chinese host law schools and of U.S. law schools through a variety of formal and informal contacts inside and outside the classroom;
  • To assist Chinese law students and faculty in understanding international and U.S. laws, legal practices and standards, and law pedagogy, including clinical legal practices and pedagogy; and,
  • To provide select American lawyers with an opportunity to learn about Chinese society and the Chinese legal system and who will contribute to understanding and exchange between the U.S. and Chinese legal communities both during and following the Fellowship experience.

Each Fellow’s assignments were divided between teaching courses on American and international legal topics and co-teaching in Chinese clinical legal education programs. Fellows’ roles thus had both a program-building as well as an immediate educational purpose. Using primarily English and some Chinese in the classroom, previous Fellows taught courses in environmental law, administrative law, corporate law, internet law, civil rights law, intellectual property rights, and refugee law. Meanwhile, the clinical legal education courses they co-taught with Chinese colleagues and the guidance they provided to student legal aid programs benefitted not only the students, but also their clients, and strengthened the overall clinical legal education program. Fellows generally taught around six to eight hours per week in a classroom setting to allow ample time for their involvement in clinical activities. The clinics where Fellows served have undertaken cases protecting consumer, labor and civil rights, as well as cases in criminal defense, environmental, and tort law. 

Following the rapid development of clinical legal education and the proliferation of clinics in Chinese law schools across the country, Yale-China decided in 2009 to refocus its law work on public interest law. The current Law Fellowship, though very different from its initial incarnation, still draws on the lessons and experiences provided by the first group of Yale-China Law Fellows. In fact, Yale-China’s Law Fellow in 2012 was a student of the law clinic at Sun Yat-sen University, bringing the program full circle and creating continuity between both the American and Chinese Yale-China Law Fellows.

Yale-China: Program Highlights
 

Program Highlights

Residency Training Program Timeline:

2006
Initial Discussions with Xiangya about collaborations in broad medical, nursing, and hospital areas

2007
Residency training as one of the focus areas of a broader collaboration between YCA and Xiangya emerges

Aug 2007
YCA assessment trip to Changsha

Oct 2007
First Exchange under the collaborative residency training program at Xiangya
YCA trip to Changsha

Apr 2008
Xiangya Residency Training Leader to Yale
Vice President of Xiangya Hospital who is later the CSU Medical Affairs Director, Vice Director of
Medical Affairs from the University and Directors of Medical Affairs from each of the three affiliated hospitals
The development of the six core competencies and the discussion on a global assessment form

May 2008
YCA trip to Changsha
Refinement of the six core competencies and the development of the global assessment form
Start of the pilot programs in internal medicine, psychiatry and general practice

Oct 2008
YCA trip to Changsha
The refinement of a global assessment form to evaluate residents around the six core competencies
Identifying the need for program directors

Jul 2009
Xiangya Residency Training team trip to Yale
Led by Vice President of the third Xiangya Hospital, the three newly appointed residency training
program directors and the three vice directors of medical affairs from the hospitals
Global Assessment Form with behavioral anchors developed and introduction of Mini-CEX
New teaching methods introduced
Responsibilities of the program directors and the medical affairs vice directors defined

Oct 2009
YCA trip to Changsha
Training curricula discussion and initial evaluation
Teaching methods

Mar 2010
YCA visit to Changsha
A brief meeting to discuss progress and planning for activities for the next year

Oct 2010
Xiangya Residency training team to Yale
Led by Vice Dean of Xiangya School of Medicine, Xiangya Psychiatry, Internal Medicine, and General Practice
program directors and department chairs, as well as CSU Medical Affairs Vice Director
Formal discussion and the start of the development of university and hospital policy support structure

Oct. 2010
YCA trip to Changsha
Continued discussion following October Xiangya trip to Yale
Update of pilot programs at the three affiliated hospitals
CSU and Xiangya leadership change and Xiangya leadership commitment to residency work

Mar 2011
YCA trip to Changsha
Xiangya set goals to expand the pilot residency training programs from three departments to another dozen different departments
New program directors for the first wave of expansion departments selected
Faculty development work started and program director responsibility system implemented

Feb to
May 2011
Xiangya Internal Medicine program director in residence at Yale developing Xiangya Residency Training
Evaluation model and investigating faculty promotion system at Yale

May 2011
Xiangya delegation visit to Yale
Led by the Dean of Xiangya, other members include CSU Director of Medical Affairs (who oversees residency training for all hospitals), President or VPs of all three affiliated hospitals, and CSU director of Human Resource
Discussion of promotion system to support education
Discussion of residency training evaluation
Xiangya discussed their plan to further expand the residency training

Oct 2011
YCA trip to Changsha
Series of residency documents published at CSU Xiangya School of Medicine
-New standards published on organizational structure, operational methods, management policy, personnel responsibility, protected time.
-Further development of training scope, training goals, curriculum design, progress management, evaluation.
Xiangya Hospital: met with related department directors, project managers, residency faculties; reviewed residency training evaluation development.
Second Xiangya Hospital: Residency training reports and progress; met with residency program director of surgery.
Policy documents related to residency published and disseminated.
Third Xiangya Hospital: Vice President Zhu gave overview of residency program, currently no residency directors selected, hospital
undergoing personnel reorganization, but hope to identify directors in the near future.

Feb 2012
Xiangya delegation visit to Yale
TAO Lijian, Dean of Xiangya, CHEN Xiang, VP of Xiangya Hospital and CHANG Shi, a faculty from surgery of the same department
Further discussion on residency training
Learning about Yale’s current undergraduate medical education curricula and the newly developed

Mar 2012
YCA trip to Changsha
Visited each of the three affiliated hospitals and learned about work to date
Discussion with leadership about the next steps in residency work

May-June 2013
Dr. DENG Youwen, Surgery Residency Program Director of Second Xiangya Hospital Visits Yale

For the past six years, Xiangya has made impressive strides on residency training. Some of the advances included the development of a Xiangya system-wide set of competency based requirements for its residency trainee and policies requiring the completion of such training before clinical appointment, a set of detailed evaluation tools for the residents and teaching faculty, appointment of personnel responsible for residency training management and teaching, the development of clear university policies that support residency and medical education, and a management structure that has been put in place to track residency training work.

Yale-China: Events and Sessions
 

Events and Sessions

The 13th Annual Chia Family Health Fellowship Conference
Living Well: Addressing Quality of Life and Mental Health in China

October 24, 2014
Lecture Hall, Chenggong Campus, Kunming Medical University

Morning Session
8:30 AM-9:00 AM
Opening Ceremony
Kunming Medical University Welcome remark

Yale-China remark
Nancy Yao Maasbach
Executive Director, Yale-China Association

Central South University Representative Remark
Central South University

9:00 AM-9:20 AM
Group Photo

9:20 AM-10:00 AM
Yale Faculty Presentation – Joanne Iennaco, Ph.D.
Yale University School of Nursing

10:00 AM-11:30 AM
Chia Fellow Presentation

XU Fang – “Comparative Nutritional Status of Migrant and Non-Migrant School Children in Kunming, China”
Lecturer, School of Public Health, Kunming Medical University

YAN Chunli – “Social Support, System and Quality of Life in Chinese Women with Breast Cancer: A Cross-Sectional Study”
Deputy Head Nurse, Department of Surgery
Third Xiangya Hospital, Central South University

11:30 AM-11:50 AM
Tea Break + Poster Session

11:50 AM-12:30 PM
Kunming Medical University Faculty Presentation

12:30PM-2:00PM
Lunch Break

2:00 PM-3:30 PM
Chia Fellows Presentation

XIE Jianfei – “A Modified Behavioral Activation Treatment for Geriatric Depressive Symptoms in Rural Left-Behind Elderly”
Deputy Head Nurse, Transplant Center
Third Xiangya Hospital, Central South University

WANG Yanjiao – “Evaluating the Cut-Off Score for the Chinese Version of Caregiver Strain Questionnaire”
Deputy Head Nurse, Psychiatry Department
First Affiliated Hospital, Kunming Medical University

3:00PM-4:30PM
Tea Break + Poster Session

Yale-China: Select Fellow Presentations and Posters
 

Select Fellow Presentations and Posters

At the Chia Conference each year, Fellows who spent the previous fall semester at Yale present their projects and report on their research progress. The conference also provides continuing education opportunities for Fellows and colleagues from Xiangya School of Medicine, Kunming Medical University and other health care institutions in Hunan and Yunnan through plenary talks and workshops offered by senior Chinese and American faculty.

LI Li - Head Nurse of Emergency Dept, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University

Impact of a Target Intervention on Childhood Risk Taking Behavior

LIU Hong - Associate Chief Physician in Geriatrics Dept, The Second Xiangya Hospital, Central South University

Effectiveness of Disease Management Program on Clinical Outcome in Patients with Heart Failure in China

XIAO Xia - Lecturer, School of Public Health, Kunming Medical University

Community Health Service of Prevention and Control for Hypertension in Kunming City, Yunnan Province, China

ZHANG Min - Associate Chief Physician of Cardiology Dept, The First Affiliated Hospital, Kunming Medical University

Burnout is associated with poorer recovery of physical function after heart attack? A hospital-based prospective cohort study in patients after their first acute coronary syndrome

Yale-China: Yale (English) Fellows: Frequently Asked Questions<a name=
 

Yale (English) Fellows: Frequently Asked Questions 

Jump to Eligibility or Application

About the Fellowship

Q: How many hours per week do Yale-China Fellows typically teach?
A: While the teaching load varies slightly from site to site, Fellows teach no more than 12 hours of class a week. Preparation and grading are not included in those 12 hours. Teaching hours are capped at 12 hours so that fellows can devote sufficient time to language acquisition and cultural exploration.

Q: I have already been studying Chinese — what do I do when we go for language training?
A: Fellows who have previously studied Mandarin or Cantonese take a placement test and are placed in the class level most appropriate for their ability. Mainland-based Fellows study Mandarin and are enrolled in an intensive summer program at CET in Beijing or at Sun Yat-sen University in Guangzhou. Hong Kong-based Fellows study Cantonese and are enrolled in an intensive summer Cantonese course that is taught on the campus of The Chinese University of Hong Kong. Hong Kong Fellows may also opt to study Mandarin instead of Cantonese.

Q: Do Fellows continue to study Chinese in a formal manner after their first summer?
A: Throughout their two-year assignments, Fellows continue their language study either with individual tutors or by enrolling in classes on campus. The stipends paid to Fellows by Yale-China and/or the host institution include funds for language-study. Typically, mainland-based Fellows use these funds for private tutoring, while Hong Kong-based Fellows enroll in formal classes on campus.

Q: Isn't it difficult to learn Chinese while working as an English teacher?
A: Yale-China Teaching Fellows work closely with Chinese colleagues and students, making Chinese language acquisition a very important part of the fellowship. By engaging non-English-speaking colleagues and members of the local community, past Fellows have been extremely successful in learning both written and spoken Chinese.

Q: How is the Yale-China Fellowship different from a Light Fellowship?
A: Yale-China funds a full summer of intensive Chinese language study and provides resources for continued language study throughout the fellowship term, since Chinese language ability is an essential skill if one is going to truly understand China at a deeper level. The Yale-China program pushes Fellows beyond the role of a student, however, challenging them to also take on roles as teachers, leaders, mentors, and friends - all roles that require the use of high-level Chinese in an immersive setting. The second year of the fellowship solidifies Fellows' abilities and ties to the community through all these roles, including a high level of fluency in Chinese language.

Q: What distinguishes the Yale-China Fellowship from other teach-in-China programs?
A: The Yale-China Fellowship is built on more than a century of history; in fact many of the other programs out there are part of our legacy, having been founded and led by former Fellows. Over the decades, we have continually striven to ensure that our program remains a model for others to aspire to, so that Fellows are always at the vanguard of our area of work - work that consists not only of teaching, but of deeper thought about taking full advantage of the opportunity that is created when a recent Yale graduate goes to live in a Chinese community for two years. Specific elements of the current program structure that set it apart include long-term, individually-forged relationships with our partner institutions in China; emphasis on engaging with the local community outside the classroom; and the level of support provided to Fellows to ensure they can achieve meaningful results in any areas of service, learning, and leadership they pursue. The Yale-China Fellowship offers the chance to experience the all-around personal growth that is characteristic of Yale without the confines of being a student.

Q: Why is the number of Fellows so small?
A: Institutionally, the Yale-China Association has always favored depth over breadth. This value is particularly important for the fellowship program, which would fundamentally change in nature if its size exceeded about 20 people: even if it were realistic to scale up the resources needed to provide the level of support that ensures the quality of the program, the intimacy of the community of Fellows is a critical piece of the program's support structure. Furthermore, few people possess the particular combination of talents that make a Fellow both effective and open to in-depth learning from another culture. Fellowship appointments are not made on a "pass/fail" basis; only those candidates who truly amaze the selection committee are sent to represent Yale in China.

About Eligibility 


Q: What are you looking for in a candidate?
A: Please see our Eligibility and Selection Criteria page for more information.

Q: Is the Fellowship only open to graduates of Yale College?
A: Although most applicants are graduates of Yale College, recent graduates from Yale graduate programs are also eligible and welcome to apply.

Q: Are international students allowed to apply?
A: International students with native-speaker level English are welcome to apply to the program. Unfortunately, we cannot accept candidates who possess lower than native-speaker fluency for this program.

Q: What if I've never studied Chinese or taken China-related coursework?
A: Although many applicants have already studied Chinese or have taken China-related coursework, a background in China or Chinese is not required. There are places in the application where you have the opportunity to discuss why you want to go to China at this time in your academic/professional career.

Q: I would like my spouse, fiancé(e), or significant other ("Partner") to live with me in China. Am I still eligible for the fellowship?
A: Yes, you are eligible for the fellowship. All Fellows are expected to engage fully with the household of Fellows at their teaching site and actively participate in community life of the host school. As a result, the structure of the program may present challenges for Fellows who plan to bring their Partners. Fellow housing at all sites is in shared accommodations provided by the host school. These shared apartments serve as the physical space where collaboration on teaching and other Fellowship responsibilities take place. Partners would need to arrange for their own housing, creating a situation in which commitment to the fellowship would need to be carefully balanced with commitment to an off-site Partner.

Yale-China is only able to offer general advice and minimal support in securing transportation, visas, housing, employment, and any other arrangements for your Partner, and no expenses related to a Partner will be covered. If you intend for your Partner to live in the same city as you during your fellowship term, the Selection Committee may require both of you to attend the final interview, as it is likely s/he will be involved in the fellowship community to some extent; if selected, though, only you will be treated as a program participant, and not your Partner. Applicants with specific questions about their situation are encouraged to contact Brendan Woo at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

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 About the Application 

Q: Can I defer if accepted?
A: We do not grant deferrals, though candidates are welcome to reapply in the future.

Q: Are all appointments for a two-year period? Is it possible to apply for a one-year fellowship?
A: Appointments are always for two years and begin in June. As alumni of the program invariably attest, the two-year duration of the Fellowship is a formative and necessary condition for the rich cross-cultural and professional experience that is the hallmark of the Yale-China Teaching Fellowship. In the first year, Fellows become oriented to the culture and the classroom; in the second year, they build on this knowledge to enter more deeply into the community and reach more consistent teaching success. Second-year Fellows also can guide new Fellows and pursue interests that were passed over in the first year due to the business of learning to teach and live in China. In addition, for Fellows who are learning Chinese from a beginner or intermediate level, an additional year often means the difference between intermediate and advanced proficiency.

Q: Can I hand-deliver my transcripts to Yale-China?
A: Yes, as long as they are in a sealed and signed envelope from the registrar.

Q: Can my residential college dean serve as one of my three recommenders?
A: Yes, but your dean still needs to fill out the dean's form, which is available on this page.

Q: Why do you require a recommendation from a foreign language instructor? What do I do if I haven't taken a foreign language at Yale?
A: The summer language programs that Yale-China Fellows attend require a recommendation from a foreign language instructor. If you have not taken a foreign language at Yale, you must submit a recommendation from a high school foreign language instructor instead. In addition, gaining proficiency in Chinese is an essential part of this fellowship, and the selection committee is interested in considering your track record as a student of foreign languages.


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Yale-China: Yale (English) Fellows: Testimonials
 

Yale (English) Fellows: Testimonials

"Other than the 24 months following my birth, during which I learned how to speak and go to the bathroom on my own, my stay in China was the most important two years of my life.

"The experiences I had during that time—some wonderful, some awful; the challenges, the stretches of boredom and frustration, the unforgettable generosity of some people; the joys and disappointments of teaching; the shifts in perspective that come … and the deep satisfaction of knowing that you must draw on your best resources to make the most of your time there—all of these things have affected me in ways that continually surprise and encourage me. It was no picnic, but it was a hell of a worthwhile adventure."
—Mark Salzman, (Hunan Medical University, 1982-1984), bestselling author.

"For many Chinese students, having a Yale-China teacher is their one 'study abroad' experience."
—Seiji Shirane, (Sun Yat-sen University, 2004-2006), Blakemore Fellow, Tsinghua University, Beijing.

"Will our personalities and personal histories have a lasting effect on [our students]? When I talk to them about a modernistic skyscraper or an opulent ancient palace, I am not simply speaking about architecture as a discipline. I hope that they can hear me speak about a subject that I truly love, and I hope that they hear the subtext: I am also telling them that they should seek out passion in their own academic lives....I am urging them to understand that anything is possible in their futures, that they can mold their lives into any shape that they desire."
—Ming Thompson, (Yali Middle School, 2004-2006), Architect, Bohlin Cywinski Jackson.

"It [the Yale-China fellowship] was one of those experiences that if anybody had ever told me in great detail what life would be like, I would have said, 'I can’t do that.' But I...learned a great lesson about myself, which was that I could do a whole lot more than I had ever thought I could."
—Martha Finn Brooks, (Hunan Medical University, 1981-1983), corporate director

"If I hadn't done Yale-China, I wouldn't be in Hong Kong today, doing what I do. The exposure I had to China and the language skills I developed there have been invaluable in my career."
—Peter Stein, (Wuhan University, 1986-1988), Head of Group, Governmental Affairs, Asia Pacific, UBS.

"The challenge of communicating/connecting across a significant cultural divide—in the classroom and out—has made me a more careful clinician, researcher and friend. I don’t assume that I get where someone is coming from until I've done some careful work first. I attribute this caution to my efforts to cross the culture gap between me and my students and friends in Hong Kong."
—Clark McKown, (New Asia College, 1990-1992), Executive Director, Rush NeuroBehavioral Center

"Teaching at Yali Middle School in Yuanling during WWII and for one semester in Changsha when the school returned in 1946 has had a far-reaching effect on my life. After my experience in China, I changed my field in graduate studies to anthropology, while serving as Executive Secretary of Yale-in-China in New Haven. The perspective that I gained from living in a society and culture quite different from my own gave me insight as an anthropologist that I would not otherwise have had."
—J. Kenneth Morland, (Yali Middle School, 1944-1946), Retired Professor of Social Anthropology.

"Ultimately, I believe my experience teaching in China directed me toward medicine for three reasons: 1) it reminded me how important my own cultural heritage is, and encouraged me to "return to my roots" in Mississippi, where physicians are greatly needed, 2) it encouraged me to settle upon a career that in some way has a teaching component, and 3) it encouraged me to seek a career that would allow me to return to China from time to time, with skills and training that will be as useful as being a native English speaker. On a personal level, my experience teaching in China informs me everyday, yet I still find myself at a loss for words when asked 'How was China?'"
—Carolyn Greene, (Hunan Medical University, 1990-1992), Epidemic Intelligence Officer for the U.S. Center for Disease Control.

"Yale-China gave me an international perspective, which I have retained ever since. I traveled to India as a medical student, worked in a smallpox hospital after graduation from medical school and spent 3 months in cholera research in Calcutta while training. My research on adult immunization stressed national policy, and in the 1980s began to involve me in some work in Canada, the UK, later Western Europe and now countries in Asia and Latin America. I have developed close contacts with the staff of the Expanded Programme of Immunization at the World Health Organization and continue to urge them to develop initiatives in adult immunization in developing countries. My research continues to emphasize international comparisons of vaccine use and policy."
—David Fedson, (New Asia College, 1959-1961), Aventis Pasteur MSD, Director of Medical Affairs for Europe.

"Whew! Without going into great detail, it’s completely changed my scholarly interests, and now I am addicted both to teaching and studying about China. I have much more to talk about at cocktail parties. I also saw a side of China which is invisible to travelers and academics—the gritty reality of life in Changsha in all its hopes and despairs. Watching the seasons change, seeing the children on campus grow up, I felt that I was a part of that life—a resident of Yali Middle School and a member of Changsha’s population—hardly an outside observer. The attachment I felt was so strong that even now, two years later, I long to go back with a feeling that can only be described as homesickness."
—Steve Platt, (Yali Middle School, 1993-1996), Professor of Chinese History at University of Massachusetts Amherst.

"My participation in the Yale-China [teaching fellowship] was unquestionably the most pivotal experience in my career and arguably the most impactful experience in my adult life. The challenges thrown at me in Changsha helped me discover both my strengths and weak points and bred in me a passion that drives me to this day. I joined [Yale-China] as a blithering idealist with an undefined urge to do good; I left Changsha as a realist, still idealistic but better equipped with the tools to make a contribution. Everything I’ve done since then has built on those skills and focused very clearly on China. That’s a direction I hope to maintain for the rest of my career."
—Drew Nuland, (Hunan Medical University, 1986-1988), Managing Director, Noribachi Group.

"The experience has had just as big an impact on my professional life. Some of this is concrete, or linear: For a decade after I left Changsha my work involved China in one way or another. As tour guide, banker, importer, teacher and lawyer/diplomat, I worked with Greater China, Chinese immigrants, and Americans interested in China. I believe that my experience in Changsha, with its intense, grassroots (relative to the Beijing/Nanjing/Shanghai/Guangzhou experiences of most U.S.-China hands, anyway) involvement with Chinese people and the PRC system, prepared me well to play in these arenas, principally because I learned to solve problems pragmatically. Much more important to me, however, was the combination of self-confidence and humility that my China experience taught. Having lived, indeed thrived, for two years in my way around an opaque system of central directives filtered through illiterate, often venal peasant-bureaucrats, I am seldom surprised by the seemingly bizarre, or obviously selfish, behavior one encounters in U.S. institutions—nor do I doubt my ability to work around or through it, if I apply myself. On the other hand, having seen brilliant Chinese students and friends buffeted by political and social forces far beyond their control, I recognize how much I owe to circumstances or luck. I think my Changsha experience made me more tenacious, wiser about the variety of human motivations, and more willing to walk around, question, and act on my own analysis. These traits have, I believe, served me well in my various professional roles."
—David Jones Jr.,(Hunan Medical University, 1980-1982), Chairman and Managing Director, Chrysalis Ventures, Inc.

"Teaching at Hu-Yi was an excellent transition between my college life/reality of Asian Studies with my future—medicine. In China I became interested in the political/international aspects of medicine as manifest in public health, reproductive health, abortion rights and abuses. I had always known I was interested in medicine, but my time with Yale-China in Changsha and Wuhan broadened my interests to international public health and women’s health and moved me in those directions…."
—Audrey Garrett, (Hubei Medical University, 1987-1989), Gynecologic Oncologist.

"Two greatest years of my life—made me aware of other countries, peoples—their problems and needs. Traveled Trans Siberian Railway in 1936—all around China and Far East. My later business life included travel everywhere except Africa. Participation in teaching program was instructive, fun, and created friendship."
—Sidney Sweet Jr.,(Yali Middle School, 1936-1938), Retired President, C. Tennant, Sons & Co. of New York.

"My Yale-China experience has profoundly affected my life. After leaving China I spent 2 years in graduate school studying China and later spent three years in Los Angeles working with refugees from Asia. I entered law school to become involved in public interest work affecting immigrants in the U.S. who I’ve believed for many years are unfairly blamed for our current social/economic ills. I specifically chose to become a public defender to address the lack of legal representation received by immigrants (documented or otherwise) in California. I initially worked in Monterey Park, CA for the L.A. Public Defenders Office, the large Chinese community east of L.A., where I represented Chinese and Vietnamese defendants. I now work in San Diego, representing primarily Latino, African-American, and Vietnamese clients. My Yale-China experience truly sensitized me to the needs and aspirations of cultures other than my own. It put a "face" on what previously had been just an academic exercise (no fault of Yale's!)."
—Joe Pertel, (Hunan Medical University, 1985-1987), Public Defender in Los Angeles.

"It has had enormous impact, in every direction. In Hong Kong I became fascinated with the rule of law and rights, both as a way to understand the challenges inherent in the colony’s transition to Chinese rule, and as a way to explain American society to my students. I ultimately won a fellowship to study rights in Hong Kong, and through that experience became familiar with the plight of Vietnamese boat people there. That led me to become the main researcher on Vietnam and Cambodia for Human Rights Watch, a position that has brought me to Asia many times since. Asia is an intellectual touchstone for me when I consider the role of law in society, the universality of rights, the interplay between civil and political freedoms and economic development. I have been fortunate in making life-long friends in Hong Kong through Yale-China, and elsewhere in Asia through my work in the region."
—Dinah PoKempner, (New Asia College, 1981-1983), General Counsel, Human Rights Watch.

"I am a much richer person. My most important professional experience to date was producing and directing an hour-long documentary on the Chinese economy for the Wall Street Journal television series "Emerging Powers" which aired on PBS…. I was considered for the job in large part because of the time I spent in China—so quite literally, participation in the Yale-China program helped me land the most important job of my career."
—Mary Ann Rotondi, (Wuhan University, 1983-1985), Producer, Dateline NBC.

"My entire career, through many diverse jobs, has been China/Asia related. Unquestionably the single most important impact on my personal and professional life. Fair to say that everything since Hong Kong has been a trajectory from the Yale-China experience."
—Doug Murray, (New Asia College, 1958-1960), President Emeritus, Lingnan Foundation.

"The linguistic foundation and cultural understanding I acquired through the Yale Bachelor program were the core advantages I brought to my years as an operations officer for the World Bank, working to develop programs in cooperation with Chinese officials that addressed key issues of rural poverty and environmental degradation."
—Thomas B. Weins, (New Asia College, 1964-1966), Former Principal Agricultural Specialist, World Bank.

Yale-China: Job Network
 

Job Network

The Yale-China Job Network is a service we offer to our members, alumni, and friends. This site is meant to be a place where potential employers and job seekers can connect. If you have a China-related job opening, internship, or travel opportunity, please send it to us at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) for posting.

Please note that the Yale-China Association does not endorse any of the positions listed within this site, except for its own employment and internship opportunities.

Yale-China: Alumni
 

Alumni

The Yale-China Association continues to maintain its reputation as a leader in improving health, education, and cultural understanding in China and the United States; it does so in large part through the legacy and network established by former program participants. If you are a member of this invaluable community, we hope you will stay involved with Yale-China through the initiatives listed below, and we plan to offer more ways to re-connect in the future.

  • Tell us your story
  • Visit our Job Network
  • Upcoming events

Yale-China: Publications
 

Publications

Yale-China produces a range of reports and updates on its wide variety of activities in China and the United States. Experience our programs for yourself through electronic editions of our publications.

Sign up for our mailing list to be notified of our next publication.

Yale-China: Yale-China Nonprofit Internship Program – Asian Charity Services
 

Yale-China Nonprofit Internship Program – Asian Charity Services

About Asian Charity Services

Asian Charity Services
www.asiancharityservices.org
Location: Hong Kong
Number of Interns: 2
Language Requirement: English; Knowledge of Cantonese/Mandarin helpful. 

Asian Charity Services (ACS), a registered charity, was established in 2007 to serve nonprofit organizations that serve Hong Kong's neediest citizens and communities. ACS provides pro bono business consulting services, training and solutions to other Hong Kong-based charities so that they may operate more effectively and better serve their communities.

There are thousands of charities across Hong Kong making a difference in their local communities every day. Charity leaders are often experts in their field of work but may need help in areas such as capacity building, developing sustainability, long term strategic planning, and fundraising. By providing pro bono business resources and capacity building tools, ACS enables them to be more impactful and focused in fulfilling their mission.

While the majority of ACS' nonprofit clients are currently based in Hong Kong, many run programs that impact lives across Asia.

Internship Description

Previous Yale-China interns have worked on the following projects:

  • Analyzed effectiveness and impact of the training and consulting that ACS had given to organizations through ACS signature programs and presented to the team;
  • Brainstormed ideas, drew material based on charities’ feedback towards ACS programs and prepared a video to be used at a fundraising gala;
  • Conducted research into branding and marketing strategies, corporate partnership for nonprofits organization; Conducted research on the recent trends of the social enterprises development.

This is an excellent opportunity for students who wish to gain broad exposure to the development and capacity building of nonprofit organizations in Hong Kong. Interns will have opportunities to interact with a range of actors in the nonprofit sector in Hong Kong through their work at ACS. Excellent writing and research skills, as well as an interest in the work of nonprofit organizations or the public sector, are helpful for this placement.

Funding

All Yale-China Nonprofit Interns receive a travel grant to help pay for airfare to China and defray the cost of living expenses. Housing and visa support is also provided, as is the cost of the End-of-Summer Service Project. Interns are responsible for their own personal expenses, any expenses that are not covered by the travel grant, and any costs related to health preparation and/or vaccinations.

Yale-China: Yale-China Law Fellowship – Past Work in Law
 

Yale-China Law Fellowship – Past Work in Law

Yale-China’s Previous Work in Clinical Legal Education

Yale-China's forte has long been our ability to deliver high quality, effective programs designed to meet specific and emerging needs on the ground in China. One such example is the Yale-China Law Fellows Program, which was developed in response to official and grassroots efforts to strengthen the rule of law in China. These efforts have precipitated new challenges, chief among them the need to bolster legal education so that judges and lawyers are equipped to navigate this new legal landscape. Yale-China's law program responded to this challenge by sending young U.S.-trained attorneys to China for one year to teach courses on U.S. and international legal practices and standards. Yale-China also helped to pioneer the field of clinical legal education in China, which provides one of the best avenues through which Chinese law schools can begin to foster communities of students and teachers prepared to use the law to serve the public interest.

Beginning in 2000, Yale-China appointed nine early-career U.S. lawyers as Yale-China Law Fellows, seven of whom taught in China for one academic year, and two of whom taught for longer periods. These Fellows were integrated into the educational programs of seven of China’s major law schools: Tsinghua University, Beijing; Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou; Wuhan University and South-Central University of Politics and Law, Wuhan; Northwest University of Politics and Law, Xi’an; Yunnan University, Kunming; and Hunan University, Changsha. The goals and objectives of this program were:

  • To foster understanding and cooperation involving students and faculty members of the Chinese host law schools and of U.S. law schools through a variety of formal and informal contacts inside and outside the classroom;
  • To assist Chinese law students and faculty in understanding international and U.S. laws, legal practices and standards, and law pedagogy, including clinical legal practices and pedagogy; and,
  • To provide select American lawyers with an opportunity to learn about Chinese society and the Chinese legal system and who will contribute to understanding and exchange between the U.S. and Chinese legal communities both during and following the Fellowship experience.

Each Fellow’s assignments were divided between teaching courses on American and international legal topics and co-teaching in Chinese clinical legal education programs. Fellows’ roles thus had both a program-building as well as an immediate educational purpose. Using primarily English and some Chinese in the classroom, previous Fellows taught courses in environmental law, administrative law, corporate law, internet law, civil rights law, intellectual property rights, and refugee law. Meanwhile, the clinical legal education courses they co-taught with Chinese colleagues and the guidance they provided to student legal aid programs benefitted not only the students, but also their clients, and strengthened the overall clinical legal education program. Fellows generally taught around six to eight hours per week in a classroom setting to allow ample time for their involvement in clinical activities. The clinics where Fellows served have undertaken cases protecting consumer, labor and civil rights, as well as cases in criminal defense, environmental, and tort law. 

Following the rapid development of clinical legal education and the proliferation of clinics in Chinese law schools across the country, Yale-China decided in 2009 to refocus its law work on public interest law. The current Law Fellowship, though very different from its initial incarnation, still draws on the lessons and experiences provided by the first group of Yale-China Law Fellows. In fact, Yale-China’s Law Fellow in 2012 was a student of the law clinic at Sun Yat-sen University, bringing the program full circle and creating continuity between both the American and Chinese Yale-China Law Fellows.

Yale-China: Medical Student and Resident Exchange
 

Medical Student and Resident Exchange

In collaboration with the Yale School of Medicine’s Office of International Medical Student Education, the Yale-China Association sends medical students from the Xiangya School of Medicine and Yale School of Medicine for four weeks clinical electives at the partner school and its affiliated hospitals.

For More Information

Yale School of Medicine Office of International Medical Student Education

Yale-China: Partner Schools
 

Partner Schools

Yale-China emphasizes long-term relationships with both individuals and institutions, but we also lead the way in discerning new areas of need. Our portfolio of teaching sites reflects this range, from Yali Middle School, founded by Yale-China in 1906, to Xiuning Middle School, where Yale-China Teaching Fellows first arrived in 2006.

Quick Links

Yale-China: Yale (English) Fellows: Eligibility and Selection Criteria
 

Yale (English) Fellows: Eligibility and Selection Criteria

With a legacy of excellence to maintain, the Yale-China Association selects only the most outstanding applicants to carry on its fellowship tradition. We look not only for intelligence, capacity for teaching, and ability to live and work abroad, but also for those candidates who will grow the most from the experience.

Eligibility

Fellows must have graduated from Yale University within five years of application (class of 2010 or later – including the class of 2015 – for the 2015-2017 fellowship term). Students of all majors and Yale schools are encouraged to apply, and prior experience with China or Chinese language is not required. International students are welcome to apply if they possess native-like English skills.

Applicants must also be eligible for visas for both mainland China and Hong Kong.

Note on medical requirements: Successful applicants who are appointed to a site in mainland China will undergo a health exam as a pre-requisite to obtaining a residence permit. Chinese law does not permit the granting of residence permits to individuals who test positive for HIV.

Selection Criteria

  • Perceptiveness and ability to reflect
  • Flexibility and willingness to adapt to foreign environments or unexpected circumstances
  • Maturity and self-reliance
  • Dedication to service
  • Interest in and capacity for teaching
  • Interest in and capacity for cultural exchange and sensitivity to cultural differences

To continue exploring your fellowship possibilities, view our Virtual Info Session.

Yale-China: Yale (English) Fellows: Application and Selection Process
 

Yale (English) Fellows: Application and Selection Process

To Apply:

  1. Attend an info session in person or online.
  2. Read the Handbook for Applicants.
  3. Read the Application Instructions.
  4. Submit an application (see below).

Each applicant is considered on the basis of his or her academic record, character, recommendations, interest in and capacity for teaching, and ability to make a meaningful contribution to Yale-China and the Chinese host institution. Because of the number of applications, Yale-China’s selection committee may not be able to interview every applicant. The committee reserves the right to make a decision on the basis of the written application alone.

Any questions may be directed to Brendan Woo at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) or (203) 432-0850.

Application Components

The deadline for applications to the 2015-2017 fellowship term is November 30, 2014. The application consists of the following components:

    Due November 30:
  • Completed application form (Form 1: [PDF] [DOC])
  • One-page résumé
  • Due December 15:
  • Official college transcript
  • Signed Residential College Dean's form (Form 2: [PDF])
  • Three letters of recommendation, including one from a Yale faculty member and one assessing your ability to learn a foreign language (Form 3: [PDF])

The second-round deadline is January 31, 2015. As all places may be filled in the first round, however, applicants are encouraged to apply by the fall deadline.

For full details on these requirements and related deadlines, please review the Application Instructions.

Prospective applicants should also carefully review the Handbook for Applicants.

Selection Process

A virtual information session will be posted on the Yale-China site by September 2014; it is strongly recommended that each applicant review it along with the Handbook for Applicants and the Application Instructions. The selection process then consists of a written application with the possibility of a preliminary interview and a final interview. Appointments to fellowship positions will be offered in late January and early February. Full details of the selection process are included in the Application Instructions, available for download above.

Outstanding candidates for whom no positions are available at the time of our initial offers may be awarded alternate status. Appointed Fellows attend a mandatory orientation retreat in May after Commencement and depart for China in June.

Teahouse and Information Sessions

The Yale-China Association will host an informational teahouse for prospective applicants on October 10, 2014 at 4:00 pm at the offices of Yale-China at 442 Temple Street (at Trumbull Street) . This event will feature former Fellows, who will share their experiences and answer questions. Chinese tea and dumplings will be provided. RSVP to Brendan Woo at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) or (203) 432-0850 by October 8 is appreciated if you plan to attend.

Additional information sessions with Yale-China staff will be held on various dates throughout the fall:

  • Tuesday, October 28 at 9:00 pm (Location TBD)
  • Wednesday, November 19 at 9:00 pm (Location TBD)

To continue exploring your fellowship possibilities, view our Virtual Info Session.

Yale-China: Students
 

Students

The Yale-China Association offers a wide variety of programs for students at Yale University, including those in Yale College, Yale professional schools, and Yale Graduate School. Browse the list below to find a program that meets your interests!

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Yale-China: Art Exhibit Series
 

Art Exhibit Series

As part of Yale-China’s mission of fostering understanding between Chinese and Americans, the Art Exhibit Series presents art and artists who explore elements, subjects, or themes inspired by Yale-China’s work at the intersection of Chinese and American culture. Yale-China also invites curators for special exhibits. Click on the photos below to see the most recent exhibits.

Other Past Exhibits

Yale-China: Research Ethics
 

Research Ethics

The Research Ethics Program, led by Yale School of Public Health faculty Kaveh Khoshnood with funding support from the National Institute of Health Fogarty International Center, is a five-year program funded by the National Institute of Health (NIH). This program seeks to establish a comprehensive collaborative program for international research ethics education and curriculum development. It does so through the joint effort of a multidisciplinary team of researchers and ethicists from Yale University, Central South University Xiangya School of Medicine, and a distinguished Training Advisory Group (TAG). The program offers short training seminars in Changsha and brings both Xiangya graduate students and young faculty to Yale for academic training.

Spring Ethics Training Workshop at Xiangya (March 18-22, 2013)

Professors Kaveh Khoshnood, Associate Professor at the School of Public Health, Madelon Baranoski, Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Vice Chair of the Human Investigation Committee at the School of Medicine, and Jamie Moreno, Fellow in Infectious Diseases at the School of Medicine, conducted a workshop in Changsha. Attended by Xiangya faculty and graduate students, the March workshop focused on three topics: ethical considerations in research on vulnerable populations, ethical considerations in research with children, and ethical dilemmas in community research.

Summer Bioethics Institute at Yale (June-July 2013)

Yale’s Interdisciplinary Center for Bioethics offers an intensive two-month summer program for American and international undergraduate and graduate students who are interested in learning more about bioethics. Participants hear a series of morning lectures surveying the field of bioethics, engage with intensive seminars on special topics, attend a bioethics film/discussion series, participate in field trips to bioethics-related institutions, and present an original paper at a final in-house “mini-conference”.

2013 Research Ethics Trainees

HUANG Feifei, Ph.D. Candidate in Nursing - Central South University, School of Nursing, Changsha CHINA
SHAN Fang, Ph.D. Candidate in Bioethics - Central South University, Changsha CHINA

Yale-China: Antiretroviral Therapy Adherence in South China
 

Antiretroviral Therapy Adherence in South China

The Antiretroviral Therapy (ART) Adherence Program, led by Yale-China trustee professor Ann Williams, focuses on behavioral intervention to increase ART adherence among HIV/AIDS patients including a molecular genetics study component that examines ART resistance at the genetic level using a new method called Ultra Deep Sequencing. Yale-China’s role in this study involves the coordination of the Ultra Deep Sequencing component.

Project Update

In June 2012, Yale-China Health Program Director Dr. Hongping Tian traveled to Changsha with professors Ann Williams and Kristopher Fennie, also a Yale-China trustee, to work with collaborators at the CSU School of Nursing and the Hunan CDC on this program.

Yale-China: Programs
 

Programs

The Yale-China Association promotes understanding between Chinese and Americans through a wide variety of programs in three main areas: Education, Health, and the Arts. Click each category to learn more.

Yale-China: Yale-China Stories
 

Yale-China Stories

Here we bring you highlights from stories shared with us by people who have been inspired by the work of Yale-China. You can view each story in its entirety by clicking on the photo below or the menu to the left.

Yale-China: Contact
 

Contact

Headquarters

Yale-China Association
442 Temple Street
Box 208223
New Haven, CT 06520

Phone: +1 203-432-0884
Fax: +1 203-432-7246
E-mail: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Hong Kong Office

Yale-China Association
Room G07, Cheng Ming Building
New Asia College
The Chinese University of Hong Kong
Shatin, NT, Hong Kong SAR

Phone: +852 3943-7605
Fax: +852 2603-5407
E-mail: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Mailing List for Yale Students

Sign up here to join our mailing list and hear about student opportunities and events from the Yale-China Association!

Yale-China: Partners
 
Yale-China: Mission, Vision, and Values
 

Mission, Vision, and Values

Founded in 1901, the Yale-China Association is a private, nonprofit organization with more than a century of experience contributing to the development of education in and about China and to the furtherance of understanding and knowledge between Chinese and American people. Yale-China's work is characterized by sustained, long-term relationships designed to build Chinese institutional capacity.

Mission

The Yale-China Association (雅礼协会) inspires people to learn and serve together. Founded in 1901 by graduates of Yale University, we foster long-term relationships that improve education, health, and cultural understanding in China and the United States.

Vision

We envision a U.S.-China relationship of mutual understanding and profound respect nurtured by collaboration among individuals and institutions.

Values

Mutual Respect: We value direct personal relationships and two-way exchanges characterized by mutual benefit, independence, trust, and understanding.
Personal Growth and Responsibility: We encourage participants and program alumni to become leading contributors to a more peaceful, just and sustainable world.
Program Focus: Relevance, Excellence, Impact, Innovation: We focus our work on regions and sectors where there is great need. We seek to implement high-quality programming with long-term impact and significant cross-cultural interchange.


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